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The material on this page is prepared by our member practitioners (vetted by PCO) and can be downloaded. 
Subject Matter Experts & Practitioners who wish to publish their Project Controls literature here, should contact PCO at info@projectcontrolsonline.com.

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Anil Godhawale

Capital Cost Optimization On Gas Fired Projects
This paper discuss the practical approach on design standardization to achieve capital cost reduction in setting up Power plants in US.

Author: Anil Godhawale
 
Free
 


Dave Brown

Fundamentals of Schedule Controls
This 5 page document which is exclusively for beginners containing arrow diagram techniques etc. takes through Fundamentals of Schedule Controls.

Author: Dave Brown
 
Free
 

Project Controls Document Requirements for Audits
List of Project Controls Documents Required for facing Audits

Author: Dave Brown
 
Free
 


Murray B. Woolf

How the WBS Can Break the Schedule

The Downside Risk of Work Breakdown Structure Implementation

The Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) is a hallmark of Dominant Project Management. One can hardly pick up
a book on either Project Management or Project Time Management without being overwhelmed by this term and
all of the praise heaped upon it. So popular is WBS that most leading Project Management authorities actually
mandate its implementation in Project Schedule development. This White Paper seeks to dampen such
unbridled enthusiasm with a splash of sober reality; about the downside risk of WBS Implementation.
 
 
 
Table of Contents
1:    Understanding a Work Breakdown Structure (WBS)
  1A:    WBS Does Not Enhance a Schedule's Temporal Functionality
  1B:    Work Breakdown Structure, Its Common Meaning
 
2: What a WBS Is
  2A:   A WBS Decomposes Project Work Scope
  2B:   A WBS Provides a Detailed Breakdown
  2C:   A WBS is Organized Hierarchically
  2D:   A WBS is Product-Oriented
 
3:   How a WBS is Used
  3A:   WBS Created by Costs Folks, Handed to Scheduling Folks
  3B:   WBS Mainly Supports Non-Temporal Project Objectives
  3C:   WBS Can Erode a Schedule's Temporal Functionality
 
4:   Definitions of Terms Used in this White Paper
 
Content Features
Pages: 24
Illustrations: 2
Bookmarked: Yes
Glossary: 9 Items 
Format: Static PDF



Author: Murray B. Woolf
 
Free
 

How to Calculate Dates in the Critical Path Method
Introducing the Ten Essential Formulas

This White Paper explains the Ten Essential Formulas* that are used to determine the Four Basic Calculated Dates associated with every Activity in a Critical Path Method (CPM) Schedule. The Four Basic Calculated Dates are: Earliest Start, Earliest Finish, Latest Start, and Latest Finish.

This White Paper provides an in-depth discussion of Date Calculation Processes, Procedures, Variables, Arithmetic Formulas, and Computational Rules. These topics are intertwined with one another.

Each of the Four Basic Calculated Dates has its own set of Arithmetic Formulas and Computational Rules. And the Arithmetic Formulas and Computational Rules, even for just one Calculated Date, differ depending on the Date Calculation Variables that dictate which Date Calculation Procedures to be followed.

The Ten Essential Formulas are: - Earliest Start with No Upstream Restrictions - Earliest Start thru Default Restriction (Finish-to-Start Dependency) - Earliest Start thru Start Restriction (Start-to-Start Dependency) - Earliest Finish thru Duration - Earliest Finish thru Finish Restriction (Finish-to-Finish Dependency) - Latest Start thru Duration - Latest Start thru Start Restriction (Start-to-Start Dependency) - Latest Finish with No Downstream Restrictions - Latest Finish thru Default Restriction (Finish-to-Start Dependency) - Latest Finish thru Finish Restriction (Finish-to-Finish Dependency)

Table of Contents

1: Overview: Date Calculation Concepts
1A: Date Calculation Specifications
1B: Four Basic Calculated Dates
1C: Date Calculation Processes
1D: Date Calculation Procedures
1E: Date Calculation Variables
1F: Date Calculation Arithmetic Formulas
1G: Arithmetic Formula Identifiers
1H: Arithmetic Formula Abbreviationsv

2: How to Calculate EARLIEST START
2A: Condition ES|dr: Earliest Start thru Default Restriction(s)
2A1: Date Calculation Process, in Plain English
2A2: Date Calculation Technical Specifications and Formulas
2B: Condition ES|sr: Earliest Start thru Start Restriction(s)
2B1: Date Calculation Process, in Plain English
2B2: Date Calculation Technical Specifications and Formulas
2C: Condition ES|mx: Earliest Start thru Restriction Type Mixture
2C1: Date Calculation Process, in Plain English
2C2: Date Calculation Technical Specifications and Formulas
2D: Condition ES|no: Earliest Start thru No Restriction Linkages
2D1: Date Calculation Process, in Plain English
2D2: Date Calculation Technical Specifications and Formulas


3: How to Calculate EARLIEST FINISH
3A: Condition EF|du: Earliest Finish thru Activity Duration
3A1: Date Calculation Process, in Plain English
3A2: Date Calculation Technical Specifications and Formulas
3B: Condition EF|fr: Earliest Finish thru Finish Restriction(s)
3B1: Date Calculation Process, in Plain English
3B2: Date Calculation Technical Specifications and Formulas


4: How to Calculate LATEST START
4A: Condition LS|du: Latest Start thru Activity Duration
4A2: Date Calculation Technical Specifications and Formulas
4B1: Date Calculation Process, in Plain English
4B2: Date Calculation Technical Specifications and Formulas

5: How to Calculate LATEST FINISH
5A: Condition LF|dr: Latest Finish thru Default Restriction(s)
5A1: Date Calculation Process, in Plain English
5A2: Date Calculation Technical Specifications and Formulas
5B: Condition LF|fr: Latest Finish thru Finish Restriction(s)
5B1: Date Calculation Process, in Plain English
5B2: Date Calculation Technical Specifications and Formulas
5C: Condition LF|mx: Latest Finish thru Restriction Type Mixture
5C1: Date Calculation Process, in Plain English
5C2: Date Calculation Technical Specifications and Formulas
5D: Condition LF|no: Latest Finish thru No Restriction Linkages
5D1: Date Calculation Process, in Plain English
5D2: Date Calculation Technical Specifications and Formulas

6: Date Calculation Computational Rules 6A: Computational Rules for Computing Earliest Start
6B: Computational Rules for Computing Earliest Finish
6C: Computational Rules for Computing Latest Start
6D: Computational Rules for Computing Latest Finish

7: Convenient Reference Information 7A: Dominant/Cognitive Terminology Conversion Table

8: Summary of Date Calculation Formulas
8A: Arithmetic Formulas: Start-of-Day or End-of-Day Perspectives
8B: Arithmetic Formulas: Point-of-Day Perspective

9: Definitions of Terms Used in this White Paper

Content Features

Pages: 46
Illustrations: 18
Bookmarked: Yes
Glossary: 26 Items
Format: Static PDF

Author: Murray B. Woolf
 
Free
 

Introducing the Point-of-Day Perspectives
A Calculation Perspective When Performing Manual Date Calculations

This White Paper explains the importance and application of three possible Date Calculation Perspectives that can be used when performing manual Date Calculations as part of Forward Pass and Backward Pass Procedures.

The Point-of-Day Perspectives refer to the choice that a Project Facilitator makes before performing manual Date Calculations* (either Forward Pass or Backward Pass). This decision affects whether the Earliest Dates (Earliest Start and Earliest Finish) and Latest Dates (Latest Start and Latest Finish) are correct, or are "off by one day.” If this makes no sense just yet, it will by the end of this White Paper.

* To learn more about how the different Date Calculation Perspectives are used, see ICS-WHITE PAPER WPB-KI-13, “How to Calculate Basic Dates in the Critical Path Method.

Table of Contents

1: The Point-of-Day Perspectives

2: Point-of-Day Terminology

3: Contrasting Points-of-Day 3A: A Few Preliminary Assumptions
3B: Using the End-of-Day Perspective
3C: Using the Start-of-Day Perspective
3D: Using the Point-of-Day Perspective
3E: Why Use End-of-Day When Manually Calculating Dates?


4: Key Definitions of Terms Used in this White Paper

Content Features

Pages: 15
Illustrations: 20
Bookmarked: Yes
Glossary: 20 Items
Format: Static PDF

Author: Murray B. Woolf
 
Free
 

When is Critical Path NOT the Most Critical Path

Introducing the Monitored Path Ranking System

Today, more than fifty years after the Critical Path Method made its debut, there still is no universally
accepted definition for the central term, Critical Path. Among the dozens of more obscure definitions, two
conflicting theories dominate scheduling glossaries: the Longest Path interpretation and the Least Total
Float Path interpretation.

As this White Paper exposes in its opening pages, these two interpretations are deficient
in three major ways:

*  From a practical perspective, they are incompatible with one another.

*  From a value perspective, they both prove incapable of actually identifying the typical Schedule's
several Critical Paths.

*  From a stability perspective, they are both based on a comparative platform that causes the Critical
Path to shift and flicker uncontrollably with each corresponding change in Schedule content.

The problem goes much deeper than a lack of agreement on how to spot a Schedule’s Critical Path.
Remarkably, there is virtually no discussion of the underlying words, “Path” or “Critical.” But even
more astounding, as this White Paper concludes, the two prevailing definitions of a Critical Path
(Longest Path and Least Total Float Path) share the same deficiencies:

*  They apply the word, “critical,” in a comparative manner.
    This leads to criticality instability.

*  They assume that a schedule has only one critical path.
    Most have multiple critical paths.

*  The conclusions one can reach, based on a single path/single goal theory, are equally limited.

*  They necessarily encourage limiting the number of date constraint imposed on the logic.

This White Paper proposes a refreshing alternative to the Critical Path concept, called the Monitored
Path Ranking System.

*  Every Finish Date Constraint is being monitored; not just the last Finish Date Constraint,
    the one that corresponds to the final Deadline Milestone, PROJECT COMPLETE.

*  All Activity Paths leading to each Finish Date Constraint are being monitored; not just the
one with the least Total Float or the one that appears to be the longest Activity Path.

*  Every Activity Path is measured and ranked according to a pre-defined scale that is equally applied to
all Activity Paths in the Schedule. This provides for apples-to-apples comparisons across all Finish
Date Constraints, across multiple Schedule Editions, and even across different Projects.

*  Since all Activity Paths that are linked to a given Finish Date Constraint are monitored and
scored statistically, it is possible to compute an Achievement Probability Value for each Deadline Milestone.

*  By tracking a set of Achievement Probability Values for a single Finish Date Constraint, one can obtain
a far better understanding regarding the effects of work progress on a given Deadline Milestone across time.

*  By comparing Achievement Probability Values across Deadline Milestones, it is possible to compute
an overall Project Achievement Probability Value.

*  By comparing Achievement Probability Values across Finish Date Constraints, Project Management
can easily recognize where managerial attention is most urgently needed. For instance, Project
Achievement Probability Values can be compared across Projects within a Program (portfolio of Projects).

*  Because Activity Path labeling is no longer subjective or comparative, Activity Path ranking will remain
more stable, less fluctuating.

*  Since every Activity Path will be recognized by a single Total Float value associated with it, Activities
that reside on multiple Activity Paths will now be able to report the multiple Total Float values
available to them.
    
 
 
Table of Contents

1:    Defining Path, Critical, and Critical Path
   1A:    Defining the Term, Path
      1A1:    Definitional Criteria for the Term, Path
      1A2:    Where Does an Activity Path Start and End?
      1A3:    Defining an Activity Path's Secondary Terminology
         1A3a:    Defining the Term, Activity
         1A3b:    Defining the Term, Series of Activities
         1A3c:    Defining the Term, Open End Condition
         1A3d:    Defining the Terms, Path Start, Path Finish, and Path Ends
   1B:    Defining the Term, Critical
      1B1:    "Critical" Must Mean More than Just Important or Essential
      1B2:    "Critical" as Used, is a Comparative Term
      1B3:    Criticality: A Chicken or Egg Question
      1B4:    Criticality Must Be Objectively, Not Subjectively, Derived
      1B5:    Critical ... to What?
      1B6:    Definitional Criteria fir the Term, Critical
   1C:    Defining the Term, Critical Path
      1C1:    Why Urgency is NOT a Comparative Value
      1C2:    No Silver Bullet Rarely Just One Critical Path
      1C3:    Definitional Criteria for the Term, Critical Path

2:    A New Paradigm for Ranking Path Urgency
   2A:    Two Additional Definitional Criteria
      2A1:    Singular Modifier is Inadequate
      2A2:    Each Finish Date Constraint Has a Set of Affecting Paths
   2B:    Putting the Two Innovative Concepts Together
      1B1:    Introducing the Monitored Path Ranking System
   2C:    Solving the "Critical Path" Definition Problem
      2C1:    Advantages of Using the Monitored Path Ranking System
      2C2:    Example pf Using the Monitored Path Ranking System
   2D:    Conclusion

3:    Definitions of Terms Used in this White Paper

 
Content Features

Pages: 37
Illustrations: 4
Bookmarked: Yes
Glossary: 24 Items
Format: Static PDF



Author: Murray B. Woolf
 
Free
 


Paul E Harris

Asta Power Project - An introduction
This document is designed to assist people who are using SureTrak, P3, Primavera Enterprise or Microsoft Project to learn the basics of PowerProject to create an unresourced schedule. (1,525 KB - Updated July 2009)
 
Free
 

Asta Power Project to Primavera Version 5.0
Asta Power Project to Primavera Version 5.0 Import and Export Some notes written by Paul E Harris on the process of exporting schedules from Asta PowerProject to Primavera Version 5.0 (449 KB - July 2007)
 
Free
 

Book Review Guide
A guide for people writing books reviews (158 KB - September 2003)

Author: Paul E Harris
 
Free
 

Cashflowing with Expenses in P6
Cashflowing with Expenses in P6 by importing for an excel spread sheet - Presented by Paul E Harris at the Insync10 conferance in Melbourne August 2010.

Author: Paul E Harris
 
Free
 

Cognitive Project Management's 3 Categories
Introducing Communal, Symbiotic, and Progressive Relationships

Project Time Management Tools are either Static or Dynamic. Static Project Time Management Tools (e.g., Listings, Timetables, and Bar Charts) rarely convey the interconnectivity of Activities with any real clarity or usefulness. The depiction of how Actions on a Project relate to one another is best left for Dynamic Project Time Management Tools. Central to any discussion of Project Time Management is something called Relationships, the aspect of Project Execution efforts (and the Schedules that seek to model them) that cause both to be dynamic human endeavors. So what are Relationships?
 
Free
 

Comparison of EVM Standards
The comparison of AS4817 Project performance using Earned Value 2006, ANSI/EIA-748-A-1998 Earned Value Management Systems and PMI Practice Standard for Earned Value Management (163 KB - 3 July 2006)

Author: Paul E Harris
 
Free
 

Converting P3 & SureTrak files to&from MS Project
Converting P3 and SureTrak files to and from Microsoft Project: This article looks at the various methods of converting files to and from Microsoft Project and P3 or SureTrak (226 KB)

Author: Paul E Harris
 
Free
 

Data to and from P3 using Excel and DBF format
Importing and Exporting data to and from P3 using Excel and DBF format This is a step by step guide on how to complete this process. (278 KB - June 2007)

Author: Paul E Harris
 
Free
 

Guidelines for Implementing P&S Software
The aim of this paper is to outline some guidelines for organizations to use when looking at implementing a corporate project planning and scheduling system. Many of these guidelines equally apply to the implementation of a stand alone planning and scheduling system. ( 314 KB - April 2004)

Author: Paul E Harris
 
Free
 

Guidelines for Training people in P&S Software
Guidelines for training people in using Planning and & Scheduling software: The aim of this paper is to outline some guidelines for organizations to structure their training as part of implementation of Planning and Scheduling software for the planning and control of projects. (151 KB - May 2005)

Author: Paul E Harris
 
Free
 

ICEC Techniques for Managing Complex Projects
Techniques for Managing Complex Projects with Planning and Scheduling Software This paper will discuss techniques that may be used for developing and managing schedules that have a large number of activities and a number of complex relationships. (246 KB)

Author: Paul E Harris
 
Free
 

Importing Microsoft Project into Primavera P6 V7
Microsoft Project and Oracle Primavera P6 Version 7 calculate differently. It is unlikely that a schedule will calculate the same dates and other values such as durations and resource data in both packages unless the schedules are very simple or a large amount of manual manipulation is applied after conversion.

Author:Paul E Harris
 
Free
 

Issues in Construction Contractors Implementing P6
Issues and Solutions facing Construction Contractors Implementing Primavera P6 Presented by Paul E Harris at the PRIMAVERA09 Peak Project Performance conference in Melbourne. (June 2009 )

Author: Paul E Harris
 
Free
 

Linking P3 Database with Excel or Access
This article demonstrates how a P3 schedule database may be linked to Excel or a dbf file using the Pervasive ODBC drivers. (278 KB)

Author: Paul E Harris
 
Free
 

Practical Application of EVPM Using P3
Practical Application of Earned Value Performance Measurement Using P3 The aims of this presentation is to review practical methods that may be used for managing projects using Earned Value Performance Measurement methods.(307 KB)

Author: Paul E Harris
 
Free
 

Primavera Bars Tricks and Traps
The defaults setting for the display of bars in Primavera P6 can be greatly improved with some formatting, this presentation outlines the issues and solutions.

Author: Paul E Harris
 
Free
 

Primavera P3 and Tilos data Interchange
Primavera P3 and Tilos data Interchange
A paper written by Paul E Harris on the import and export of data between Asta Tilos, a Linear scheduling software package from Germany. (1,356 KB - July 2007)

Author: Paul E Harris
 
Free
 

Primavera P6 Version7 Bars formatting presentation
The P6 bar defaults may be misleading. For example the Baseline bars and the Negative Float bar have the same colour and are on the same line, the Level of Effort bars are not displayed and completed activities show Total Float. This presentation outlines changes to the Primavera default bar formatting that should be considered and as a result your schedule should be clearer.

Author: Paul E Harris
 
Free
 

Selecting Project Management Software
This article is aimed at assisting companies in the process of selecting new project management software but could be applied to the selection of many other types of software. (28 KB)

Author: Paul E Harris
 
Free
 

Step-By-Step Guide Using SDK for Primavera V6.X
A Step-By-Step Guide Using Software Development Kit (SDK) for Primavera Version 6.X schedule preparation
By: Jeoffrey B. Reyes Sr.Planning Engineer Building Works / Road & Infrastructure Jubail Industrial City, K.S.

Author: Paul E Harris
 
Free
 

SureTrak % Calculation
This article explains how SureTrak calculates percent complete in the various fields available. ((102 KB)

Author: Paul E Harris
 
Free
 

Theta Planning
This document has been compiled by Andrew Dick to assist in setting up a Primavera Enterprise project to enable resource scheduling to be achieved. (4,966 KB - July 2007).

Author: Paul E Harris
 
Free
 

Using P3 Batch to Rebuild Corrupt P3 Files
The process used by Paul Harris to rebuild corrupt files. This is a zip file that includes instructions and bat files. (32KB - July 2007)

Author: Paul E Harris
 
Free
 

What Primavera P6 Baseline Bars am I Displaying?
The aim of this presentation is to explain the different types of project schedule Baselines, how the Planned Dates are calculated, why the Planned Dates often display irrelevant data, the issues with the Planned Dates, what functions control the display of the Planned Dates as Baseline Dates, and how to ensure you have the Baseline dates and not the Planned Dates displayed as Baseline Bars.

Author: Paul E Harris
 
Free
 

ProjCon Consultants

Tutorial on Causes & Types of Delays on Projects
5 Page document listing Causes & Types of delays on EPC projects

Author: ProjCon Consultants
 
Free
 

Tutorial on Earned Value Management
Tutorial on Earned Value Management explaining Earned Value Analysis, EV terms and detailed analysis on sample project.

Author: ProjCon Consultants
 
Free
 

Understanding PC Functions & responsibilities
Document providing detailed understanding of PC Functions & responsibilities

Author: ProjCon Consultants
 
Free
 

Project Controls Survey Form
Project Controls Survey form to assess the Project Controls infrastructure on projects

Author: ProjCon Consultants
 
Free
 

Project Proposal checklist
Detailed Project Proposal checklist highlighting documents requirement from Proposals/Estimating during handover.

Author: ProjCon Consultants
 
Free
 


Stevan McCarthy

Fundamentals on Project Delay Analysis
5 Page document takes through fundamentals on Project Delay Analysis

Author: Stevan McCarthy
 
Free
 

Project Controls Audit Check list
7 Pages document providing detailed checklist for performing Project Controls Audits

Author:Stevan McCarthy
 
Free
 

Project Cost Forecasting Check list
Project Cost Forecasting Check list highlighting General Processes, Material/Equipment, Labor (Self Perform), Subcontracts, Indirect Expenditure, Escalation, Contingency and Gross Profit on project

Author: Stevan McCarthy
 
Free
 

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